EASY LEARNING|WHAT ARE CONSONANT SOUNDS ?|LEARNING ENGLISH|BEST 2020
CONSONANT SOUNDS

EASY LEARNING|WHAT ARE CONSONANT SOUNDS ?|LEARNING ENGLISH|BEST 2020

WHAT ARE CONSONANT SOUNDS?|LEARNING ENGLISH|BEST 2020

CONSONANT SOUNDS

Intro  |  Vowels  | Understanding | Is Consonant less language possible?

Intro

CONSONANT SOUNDS

Intro  |  Vowels  | Understanding | Is Consonant less language possible?

CONSONANT SOUNDS

Consonant” comes a Latin word, “consonantem” which means “sounding together.” (Apparently, the Romans thought a vowel was needed in order to be able to produce a consonant or something like that.) A consonant is a sound that is made with your mouth partially closed. To make the “b” or “p” sounds, the mouth is totally closed. Less closed for “d” or “t.”

Consonants are short noisy sounds and vowels are more noisy sounds. There are 5 vowel sounds and 24 consonant sounds. Although you won’t obtain single symbols portraying those sounds, essentially because English has obtained so heavily from other languages and kept the original spelling conventions.

Consonants are sounds blocked by the tongue, teeth, or lips. They can be voiced or unvoiced. There is one consonant made with the mouth open and no blockage, but it is unvoiced: for instance, pronounce H. Then you will understand the above mentioned.

Vowels are voiced sounds made with the mouth open.

In classifying the letter symbols, there are 5 pure vowels (a, e, i, o, u), 19 pure consonants (b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, x, z), and 2 semi-vowels (y, w) in the standard English alphabet.

Specialists say that a vowel is the “nucleus” of a spoken syllable. Most syllables contain a vowel, though the consonants “y” and “w” sometimes can be vowels. They are known as “semivowels.”

For instance, wa-ter, flaw , hy-per, cry

CONSONANT SOUNDS

VOWELS

VOWELS: A,E,I,O,U

The A starts with Eh and slides down to ee.

The E starts with ee and ends with a vague uh.

Then I start with ah and slides down to ee.

The O starts with oh and slides down to oo.

The U starts with you and ends with a vague uh.

The main difference is that a vowel involves the vibration of the vocal cords. AAA OOO UUU AND you can do it for a long time

you can say ZZZ LLL RRR MMM NNN VVV for a long time, and in some languages, they might be treated as vowels. In English, they are not, but sounds like ts ch ks h f s p t k h have no vibration

English vowels are unusual because they are not pure. They start with one sound then end to another. Sounds depend on the manipulation of an airstream either leaving or entering the body. Different sounds are produced by the shape and size of the container the wind is passing through (mouth and nose) and whether there is any interference in the air stream.

Quantifying the original sounds that each letter representing is going to be a difficult task. While most of the consonants represent 1 or 2 sounds each, some of the vowels can have many pronunciations, depending on regional variations. You also have to consider digraphs and diphthongs like oi, ae, ou, sh, ch, or, and er. These letter combinations represent distinct sounds as well.

Two vowels can come together in a syllable. That’s known as a “diphthong.”

Think: “rain, good, piece, boil, touch,” etc.

CONSONANT SOUNDS

UNDERSTANDING

CONSONANT SOUNDS

English is not typically analyzed as having phonemic syllabic consonants. However, in words like ‘button’ and ‘bottle’ and ‘bottom’, the final consonant alone is in casual speech typically pronounced as a syllable in and of itself, so phonetically English does have syllabic consonants.

To understand clearly:

Vowels are:

  • Loud
  • Continuous
  • The ear recognizes through resonances caused by the shape of the mouth
  • Voiced (they have a pitch)

Consonants are sounds that are generally ideal for going in between vowels and are:

  • Soft: (p, t, k), almost silent with a small sound (b, d, g), soft and noisy (ch, f, th, s, sh, h), soft and noisy with a buzz (j, v, th(voiced), z, zh), muted (m, n, ng), or slightly muted (l, r, y, w).
  • Often noncontinuous (p, t, k, b, d, g, ch, j).
  • The ear recognizes them using the transitions of formants on the following vowels ( p, t, k, b, d, g, m, n, ng).
  • Often unvoiced (p, t, k, ch, f, th, s, sh, h).

Although all spoken languages have consonants and vowels, they differ considerably in exactly what consonants and vowels they have and how many they have of each. It turns out that the average language has about three to four times as many consonants as they have vowels.

CONSONANT SOUNDS

IS CONSONANT LESS LANGUAGE POSSIBLE?

CONSONANT SOUNDS

A consonant-less language, although theoretically possible, is unlikely to develop naturally: the diversity of consonants is much greater than the diversity of vowels, and they make a valuable addition to the overall rhythm of speech. A vowel-only phonetic set simply cannot handle well the complexity and strong vocabulary of a natural human language.

All spoken languages have vowels and consonants:

  • All languages have at least some form of ‘a’
  • All languages have an ‘i’ or ‘e’ or ‘uh’ sound
  • All languages have an ‘u’ or ‘o’ sound or ‘kw’
  • All languages have at least 3 out of ‘p, t, k, b, d, g’ and glottal stops
  • All languages except Rotokas have one out of ‘m, n, s’ or nasal vowels
  • All languages have at least consonant+vowel syllables

The basic idea is simple: we use our mouths like a kind of filter to increase some kinds of sounds at certain frequencies and dampen the force of other frequencies. It is this pattern that turns a stream of noise into a stream of potentially meaningful language.

Without a filter-effect, several negative side-effects would happen. First, we would not be able to easily recognize certain kinds of sounds from another, what scholars call discreteness. The fact that we can break down a slur of speech into the discrete segments of c /k/, a /æ/, and t /t/ to create ‘cat’ is crucial to human speech because it allows us to recombine sounds to create new totally irrelevant words.

Switch the order and you get /bæk/, ‘back’. Consequently, without discreteness, we would not have the duality(the quality of being dual), the way in which meaningless grammars can be recombined to make meaningful words.

Finally, you have to pay attention to what your mouth is doing, if it shifts from doing one thing to doing another, you have shifted sounds. Paying attention is most important and Pay attention to your mouth position in each sound, and try to maintain each one as long as possible.

Thank you for reading my article!!

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CONSONANT SOUNDS

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